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JOHN SILENCE SERIES - Complete Collection: A Psychical Invasion + Ancient Sorceries + The Nemesis of Fire + Secret Worship + The Camp of the Dog + A Victim of Higher Space Supernatural mysteries of Dr. John Silence von Blackwood, Algernon (eBook)

  • Erscheinungsdatum: 28.08.2015
  • Verlag: e-artnow
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JOHN SILENCE SERIES - Complete Collection: A Psychical Invasion + Ancient Sorceries + The Nemesis of Fire + Secret Worship + The Camp of the Dog + A Victim of Higher Space

This carefully crafted ebook: 'JOHN SILENCE SERIES - Complete Collection: A Psychical Invasion + Ancient Sorceries + The Nemesis of Fire + Secret Worship + The Camp of the Dog + A Victim of Higher Space' is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Algernon Blackwood (1869-1951) was an English short story writer and novelist, one of the most prolific writers of ghost stories in the history of the genre. Blackwood wrote a number of horror stories. His most work seeks less to frighten than to induce a sense of awe. Table of Contents: A Psychical Invasion Ancient Sorceries The Nemesis of Fire Secret Worship The Camp of the Dog A Victim of Higher Space

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    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: watermark
    Seitenzahl: 280
    Erscheinungsdatum: 28.08.2015
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9788026843665
    Verlag: e-artnow
    Größe: 586 kBytes
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JOHN SILENCE SERIES - Complete Collection: A Psychical Invasion + Ancient Sorceries + The Nemesis of Fire + Secret Worship + The Camp of the Dog + A Victim of Higher Space

Ancient Sorceries

Table of Contents I

There are, it would appear, certain wholly unremarkable persons, with none of the characteristics that invite adventure, who yet once or twice in the course of their smooth lives undergo an experience so strange that the world catches its breath-and looks the other way! And it was cases of this kind, perhaps, more than any other, that fell into the wide-spread net of John Silence, the psychic doctor, and, appealing to his deep humanity, to his patience, and to his great qualities of spiritual sympathy, led often to the revelation of problems of the strangest complexity, and of the profoundest possible human interest.

Matters that seemed almost too curious and fantastic for belief he loved to trace to their hidden sources. To unravel a tangle in the very soul of things-and to release a suffering human soul in the process-was with him a veritable passion. And the knots he untied were, indeed, after passing strange.

The world, of course, asks for some plausible basis to which it can attach credence-something it can, at least, pretend to explain. The adventurous type it can understand: such people carry about with them an adequate explanation of their exciting lives, and their characters obviously drive them into the circumstances which produce the adventures. It expects nothing else from them, and is satisfied. But dull, ordinary folk have no right to out-of-the-way experiences, and the world having been led to expect otherwise, is disappointed with them, not to say shocked. Its complacent judgment has been rudely disturbed.

"Such a thing happened to that man!" it cries-"a commonplace person like that! It is too absurd! There must be something wrong!"

Yet there could be no question that something did actually happen to little Arthur Vezin, something of the curious nature he described to Dr. Silence. Outwardly or inwardly, it happened beyond a doubt, and in spite of the jeers of his few friends who heard the tale, and observed wisely that "such a thing might perhaps have come to Iszard, that crack-brained Iszard, or to that odd fish Minski, but it could never have happened to commonplace little Vezin, who was fore-ordained to live and die according to scale."

But, whatever his method of death was, Vezin certainly did not "live according to scale" so far as this particular event in his otherwise uneventful life was concerned; and to hear him recount it, and watch his pale delicate features change, and hear his voice grow softer and more hushed as he proceeded, was to know the conviction that his halting words perhaps failed sometimes to convey. He lived the thing over again each time he told it. His whole personality became muffled in the recital. It subdued him more than ever, so that the tale became a lengthy apology for an experience that he deprecated. He appeared to excuse himself and ask your pardon for having dared to take part in so fantastic an episode. For little Vezin was a timid, gentle, sensitive soul, rarely able to assert himself, tender to man and beast, and almost constitutionally unable to say No, or to claim many things that should rightly have been his. His whole scheme of life seemed utterly remote from anything more exciting than missing a train or losing an umbrella on an omnibus. And when this curious event came upon him he was already more years beyond forty than his friends suspected or he cared to admit.

John Silence, who heard him speak of his experience more than once, said that he sometimes left out certain details and put in others; yet they were all obviously true. The whole scene was unforgettably cinematographed on to his mind. None of the details were imagined or invented. And when he told the story with them all complete, the effect was undeniable. His appealing brown eyes shone, and much of the charming personality, usually so carefully represse

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