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Kit and Kitty: A Story of West Middlesex von Blackmore, R. D. (eBook)

  • Erscheinungsdatum: 25.08.2016
  • Verlag: anboco
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Kit and Kitty: A Story of West Middlesex

UNCLE CORNY MY KITTY THE TIMBER-BRIDGE PEACHES, AND PEACHING A LITTLE TIFF THE BEAUTIES OF NATURE DE GUSTIBUS BAD COUNSEL A DOG VIOLATE AN UPWARD STROKE THE FINE ARTS AN EMPTY PILE MY UNCLE BEGINS AND ENDS WITH A MORAL MORAL SUPPORT TRUE LOVE TRUE FATHER FALSE MOTHER DOE DEM. ROE AUNT PARSLOW A TULIP BLOOM COLDPEPPER HALL AT BAY, AND IN THE BAY HARO! ON THE SHELF A DOWNY COVE OFF THE SHELF OUT OF ALL REASON A FINE TIP BASKETS THE GIANT OF THE HEATH A DREAM URGENT MEASURES TWO TO ONE UNDER THE GARDEN WALL FROST IN MAY COLD COMFORT NONE ON TWO CHAIRS JOB'S COMFORT TRUE COMFORT BEHIND THE FIDDLE THE GREAT LADY MET AGAIN ROGUES FALL OUT TONY TONKS TOADSTOOLS THE DUCHESS CRAFTY, AND SIMPLE A POCKETFUL OF MONEY NOT IN A HURRY A WANDERING GLEAM A BAD NIGHT PRINCE'S MANSION RELIEF OF MIND ANOTHER TRACE A VAIN APPEAL UNCLE CORNY'S LOVE-TALE A COOL REQUEST ALIVE IN DEATH ZINKA HASTE TO THE WEDDING THERE SAT KITTY A MENSÂ ET TORO HER OWN WAY ONE GOOD WISH

Produktinformationen

    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: watermark
    Seitenzahl: 500
    Erscheinungsdatum: 25.08.2016
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9783736411739
    Verlag: anboco
    Größe: 750 kBytes
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Kit and Kitty: A Story of West Middlesex

CHAPTER II.
MY KITTY.

The shape of a tree is not decided by the pruner only. When the leader is stopped, with an eye towards the wind, and the branches clipped to a nicety of experience and of forethought, and the happy owner has said to it-"Now I defy you to go amiss this season"-before he is up in the morning perhaps, his lecture is flown, and his labour lost.

My wise Uncle Corny had said to me, more times than I can remember-"Kit, you are a good boy, a very good boy, and likely to be useful in my business by-and-by. But of one thing beware-never say a word to women. They never know what they want themselves; and they like to bring a man into the same condition. What wonderful things I have seen among the women! And the only way out of it is never to get into it."

In answer to this I never said a word, being unable to contradict, though doubtful how far he was right. But it made me more shy than I was already, while at the same time it seemed to fill me with interest in the matter. But the only woman I had much to do with went a long way to confirm my Uncle's words. This was no other than Tabitha Tapscott, a widow from the West of England, who did all our cleaning and cooking for us, coming into the house at six o'clock in the summer, and seven in the winter time. A strange little creature she appeared to me, so different from us in all her ways, making mountains of things that we never noticed, and not at all given to silence.

Once or twice my Uncle Corny, after a glass of hot rum and water (which he usually had on a Saturday night, to restore him after paying wages) had spoken, in a strange mysterious style, of having "had his time," or as he sometimes put it-"paid his footing." It was not easy to make out his drift, or the hint at the bottom of it; and if any one tried to follow him home, sometimes he would fly off into rudeness, or if in a better vein, convey that he held his tongue for the good of younger people. Such words used to stir me sadly, because I could get no more of them.

However, I began to feel more and more, as youth perhaps is sure to do when it listens to dark experience, as if I should like almost to go through some of it on my own behalf. Not expecting at all to leave it as a lesson for those who come after me, but simply desiring to enter into some knowledge of the thing forbidden. For I knew not as yet that there is no pleasure rich enough to satisfy the interest of pain.

It was on the first Sunday of September in the year 1860, that I first left all my peaceful ways, and fell into joy and misery. And strangely enough, as some may think, it was in the quiet evening service that the sudden change befell me. That summer had been the wettest ever known, or at any rate for four and forty years; as the old men said, who recalled the time when the loaves served out to their fathers and mothers stuck fast, like clay, upon the churchyard wall. Now the river was up to the mark of the road, and the meadows on the other side were lakes, and even a young man was well pleased to feel a flint under his foot as he walked. For the road was washed with torrents, and all the hedges reeking, and the solid trunks of ancient elms seemed to be channelled with perpetual drip.

But the sun began to shine out of the clouds, at his very last opportunity; and weak and watery though he looked, with a bank of haze beneath him, a soft relief of hope and comfort filled the flooded valley. And into our old western porch a pleasant light came quivering, and showed us who our neighbours were, and made us smile at one another.

As it happened now, my mind was full of a certain bed of onions, which had grown so rank and sappy, that we had not dared to harvest them. And instead of right thoughts upon entering church, I was saying to myself-"We shall have a dry week, I do believe. I will pull them to-morrow, and chance

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