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Loving Le Corbusier von Bisset, Colin (eBook)

  • Erscheinungsdatum: 09.05.2016
  • Verlag: BookBaby
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Loving Le Corbusier

Loving Le Corbusier is a tale of love and loss set against the great events of 20th century Europe.

Produktinformationen

    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: none
    Seitenzahl: 248
    Erscheinungsdatum: 09.05.2016
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9781483570068
    Verlag: BookBaby
    Größe: 455kBytes
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Loving Le Corbusier

1921 Yvonne didn't see the slender neck for another two years but she heard about the man himself. Amédée had launched a journal with a couple of his friends which was called L'Esprit Nouveau , The New Spirit , and because of it, he was hardly ever at Jove. Germaine declared that it was ground-breaking but when she brought in the first copy for everyone to look at, it made no sense to Yvonne. For a start it didn't resemble the new magazine called Vogue that everyone at Jove swooned over. This one was very plain with a huge numeral on the front like the numbers in a classroom. There were articles on all kinds of things - the art of somebody, the music of somebody else, and even something about German poetry, which seemed a bit much, given the war. She flicked through it and found nothing of interest, not even a society column or a cartoon to laugh at. If this was ground-breaking then it was certainly not breaking any ground around her. One of the partners in the magazine was Amédée's painter friend, who was Swiss, just as Yvonne had guessed. She learned that his name was Monsieur Jeanneret and he worked around the corner from Jove. On a couple of occasions she saw him walking into offices on Rue d'Astorg and she nearly greeted him before she remembered that he wouldn't have a clue who she was. She found him strangely appealing although he was not handsome in a conventional way. He wore round spectacles and had high cheekbones that gave him a serious expression, rather haughty, a little like a priest. His clothes were ordinary enough yet there were small touches that betrayed a care for his appearance - a colourful handkerchief in his breast pocket, and meticulously polished shoes. There was a precision about him, which she supposed was rather Swiss if they were anything like the watches the country was famous for. There was something else, too. He didn't have the look of other men on the street who would give a smile or a wink as an attractive girl passed, puffing themselves up like birds so that she might notice them. It was as though his mind was elsewhere. Perhaps Yvonne saw that as a challenge. She bumped into him properly when she was buying cigarettes at a bar at the corner of Rue de Miromesnil. There was a short queue and as she waited, her eye was captured by an advertisement on the wall for the Mekka brand that showed a woman in a sumptuous apricot-coloured evening gown that was spread around her. Yvonne gazed at it and wondered for a moment what it would be like to wear a gown that took so many metres of fabric and if it would suit her own dark colouring and so, when it was her turn at the counter, she asked for the same brand. As she paid, a man behind her said, 'They're a bit strong, don't you find, those Turkish ones?' She turned while taking her change from the sales girl, and when she saw that it was him, her hand jerked and the coins scattered all over the floor. 'Oh, what a fool,' she said. 'And I normally smoke Boyard, too.' Immediately she cursed herself. It was such a stupid thing to say, as though she wouldn't have dropped the coins if she had chosen her usual brand, but out it came, without a thought. She half expected him to look at her as though she was a halfwit. He stooped to pick up the coins and she suspected he was more interested in looking at her legs, which was fine by her. He held her gaze as he handed back the coins. 'I know you, don't I?' he said. 'I recognize you from Ozenfant's place.' 'Yes, that's right. Aren't you a painter? Or a writer? I know that you had an exhibition with Amédée a year or two back.' He stepped aside so that the other people could get to the counter and she was complimented by the small sign

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