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The Complete Novels of George MacDonald (Illustrated) The Princess and the Goblin, The Princess and Curdie, Phantastes, At the Back of the North Wind, Lilith, David Elginbrod, Malcolm, Ranald Bannerman's Boyhood, Wilfrid Cumbermede and many more von MacDonald, George (eBook)

  • Erscheinungsdatum: 20.10.2015
  • Verlag: e-artnow
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The Complete Novels of George MacDonald (Illustrated)

This carefully crafted ebook: 'The Complete Novels of George Macdonald (Illustrated)' is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Table of Contents: Fantasy Fiction: The Princess and the Goblin The Princess and Curdie Phantastes At the Back of the North Wind The Lost Princess: A Double Story The Day Boy and the Night Girl The Flight of the Shadow Lilith: A Romance Realistic Fiction: David Elginbrod (The Tutor's First Love) Alec-Forbes of Howglen (The Maiden's Bequest) Robert Falconer (The Musician's Quest) Ranald Bannerman's Boyhood Wilfrid Cumbermede Gutta Percha Willie St. George and St. Michael Mary Marston (A Daughter's Devotion) Warlock o' Glenwarlock (The Laird's Inheritance) Weighed and Wanting (A Gentlewoman's Choice) What's Mine's Mine (The Highlander's Last Song) Home Again (The Poet's Homecoming) The Elect Lady (The Landlady's Master) A Rough Shaking Heather and Snow (The Peasant Girl's Dream) Salted with Fire (The Minister's Restoration) Far Above Rubies Malcolm The Marquis of Lossie (The Marquis' Secret) Sir Gibbie (The Baronet's Song) Donal Grant (The Shepherd's Castle) Annals of a Quiet Neighbourhood The Seaboard Parish The Vicar's Daughter Thomas Wingfold, Curate (The Curate's Awakening) Paul Faber, Surgeon (The Lady's Confession) There and Back (The Baron's Apprenticeship) George MacDonald (1824-1905) was a Scottish author, poet, and Christian minister. He was a pioneering figure in the field of fantasy literature and the mentor of fellow writer Lewis Carroll. His writings have been cited as a major literary influence by many notable authors including W. H. Auden, C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, Walter de la Mare, E. Nesbit and Madeleine L'Engle. G. K. Chesterton cited The Princess and the Goblin as a book that had 'made a difference to my whole existence'. MacDonald has been credited with founding the 'kailyard school' of Scottish writing.

Produktinformationen

    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: watermark
    Seitenzahl: 1850
    Erscheinungsdatum: 20.10.2015
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9788026845614
    Verlag: e-artnow
    Größe: 29746 kBytes
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The Complete Novels of George MacDonald (Illustrated)

CHAPTER VI
THE LITTLE MINER

Table of Contents

THE next day the great cloud still hung over the mountain, and the rain poured like water from a full sponge. The princess was very fond of being out of doors, and she nearly cried when she saw that the weather was no better. But the mist was not of such a dark dingy gray; there was light in it; and as the hours went on, it grew brighter and brighter, until it was almost too brilliant to look at; and late in the afternoon, the sun broke out so gloriously that Irene clapped her hands, crying,

"See, see, Lootie! The sun has had his face washed. Look how bright he is! Do get my hat, and let us go out for a walk. Oh dear! oh dear! how happy I am!"

Lootie was very glad to please the princess. She got her hat and cloak, and they set out together for a walk up the mountain; for the road was so hard and steep that the water could not rest upon it, and it was always dry enough for walking a few minutes after the rain ceased. The clouds were rolling away in broken pieces, like great, overwoolly sheep, whose wool the sun had bleached till it was almost too white for the eyes to bear. Between them the sky shone with a deeper and purer blue, because of the rain. The trees on the road-side were hung all over with drops, which sparkled in the sun like jewels. The only things that were no brighter for the rain, were the brooks that ran down the mountain; they had changed from the clearness of crystal to a muddy brown; but what they lost in color they gained in sound-or at least in noise, for a brook when it is swollen is not so musical as before. But Irene was in raptures with the great brown streams tumbling down everywhere; and Lootie shared in her delight, for she too had been confined to the house for three days. At length she observed that the sun was getting low, and said it was time to be going back. She made the remark again and again, but, every time, the princess begged her to go on just a little farther and a little farther; reminding her that it was much easier to go down hill, and saying that when they did turn, they would be at home in a moment. So on and on they did go, now to look at a group of ferns over whose tops a stream was pouring in a watery arch, now to pick a shining stone from a rock by the wayside, now to watch the flight of some bird. Suddenly the shadow of a great mountain peak came up from behind, and shot in front of them. When the nurse saw it, she started and shook, and tremulously grasping the hand of the princess turned and began to run down the hill.

"What's all the haste, nursie?" asked Irene, running alongside of her.

"We must not be out a moment longer."

"But we can't help being out a good many moments longer."

It was too true. The nurse almost cried. They were much too far from home. It was against express orders to be out with the princess one moment after the sun was down; and they were nearly a mile up the mountain! If his Majesty, Irene's papa, were to hear of it, Lootie would certainly be dismissed; and to leave the princess would break her heart. It was no wonder she ran. But Irene was not in the least frightened, not knowing anything to be frightened at. She kept on chattering as well as she could, but it was not easy.

"Lootie! Lootie! why do you run so fast? It shakes my teeth when I talk."

"Then don't talk," said Lootie.

But the princess went on talking. She was always saying, "Look, look, Lootie," but Lootie paid no more heed to anything she said, only ran on.

"Look, look, Lootie! Don't you see that funny man peeping over the rock?"

Lootie only ran the faster. They had to pass the rock and when they came nearer, the princess clearly saw that it was only a large fragment of the rock itself that she had mistaken for a man.

"Look, look, Lootie! There's such a curious creature at the foot of that old

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