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The Jackals Feed A Novel of Africa von Coltrayne, B. J. (eBook)

  • Erscheinungsdatum: 15.05.2015
  • Verlag: BookBaby
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The Jackals Feed

This is a story set in modern Africa. It is the story of the struggle between two men. There is an old saying: 'War always creates more scoundrels than it kills'. A familiar old saw but probably true. This story begins in the small, defiant, war-torn southern African country then known as Rhodesia during their bloody bush war against communist-tinged nationalist forces. But the story isn't about esoteric geo-politics during the cold war; it is about the hard men galvanized by the corrosive effects of war, tribalism, ambition, gut-level malevolence and revenge. In bloody Africa, scoundrels abound in all colors. Like all wars, the war attracted all types of men: adventurers, war profiteers, professional soldiers, opportunists and of course the true believers, both black and white. The Rhodesian War had them all in spades. One is an American leading African troops in the bush war. Another is a Chinese-trained guerrilla commander he clashes with during the final months of the war. That small, bloody battle in the bush will have profound effects on both men for many years. The war sets the stage but the bloody climax comes many years later. Both men become entangled in the smuggling of illicit nuclear materials; one as the smuggler, now a General in the Zimbabwe Army, and the other, a seasoned mercenary soldier, forced into being the pursuer. Once again, a bloody confrontation takes place in the harsh African bush. Some of the nuclear contraband is recovered but some still remains missing, destined to be used for political and tribal retribution in Zimbabwe -- a dirty bomb to be detonated during an opposition political rally. Only one man has a chance to prevent this disaster and he lies wounded and imprisoned in a filthy hut in the bush.

Produktinformationen

    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: AdobeDRM
    Seitenzahl: 245
    Erscheinungsdatum: 15.05.2015
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9781483554273
    Verlag: BookBaby
    Größe: 636 kBytes
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The Jackals Feed

PROLOGUE Dirksen Senate Office Building Room 521 Washington, D.C. USA 5 October 1978 Senator Jesse Helms, representing North Carolina, sat behind his cluttered mahogany desk becoming increasingly fidgety waiting for his 11:00 o'clock appointment. It was now 11:21 and patience was not one of Senator Helm's virtues. Across from the desk and against the wall, seated on the plush, leather sofa always present in a Senator's private office, was Senator Harry Byrd of Virginia. He was engrossed in a briefing booklet published by the Central Intelligence Agency for the Senate Foreign Relations Committee concerning the present situation in Southern Rhodesia. Indeed, both Senators were sharply opposed to President Carter's position which they thought favored the Marxist-oriented guerilla movements seeking to gain power in the mineral-rich former British colony located in the strategic and embattled southern Africa. Both Senators -- Helms had previously read the document earlier that morning -- had concerns that the intelligence analysis produced by the spy organization was intentionally biased to support President Carter's position. Carter's appointee to the position of Director of the CIA, Admiral Stansfield Turner, did little to allay those fears as he was known to be in lockstep with most of President Carter's opinions on national security. Turner had been especially forceful in his mission to reduce the human aspects of intelligence collection in favor of the more technological methods as used by the National Security Agency. President Carter, and by extension Turner, seemed to have a distrust of the Agency's clandestine capabilities, and especially their para-military branch, so both had been deeply gutted over the last few years. The report was generated because Senators Helms and Byrd, as well as many more Senators friendly to the Rhodesian cause, were to meet a Rhodesian delegation, both white and black Rhodesian political leaders, in Washington, D.C. in two days time. The Rhodesian leaders were the principal architects of a political compromise achieved over the past few months that would lead to black majority rule in what would then become Zimbabwe-Rhodesia. This past July the Senate had narrowly defeated (48 to 42) a bill to repeal the military and economic sanctions currently in place against Rhodesia. "If one were to believe this tripe, one would think that these commies in the Patriotic Front were really Eagle Scouts just looking to earn their merit badge in democracy," Senator Byrd remarked while placing the report on the coffee table in front of him. "When was the last time you heard of Eagle Scouts intentionally shooting down two civilian airliners with ground-to-air missiles?" Senator Helms replied referring to the shooting down of two Rhodesian civilian airliners by terrorists using Russian SA-7 shoulder-launched missiles. Then his secretary entered his office after a brief knock. "He's here?" Helms asked sarcastically before his secretary had a chance to inform him that General William Yarborough, his 11 o'clock appointment, had arrived. "Yes, sir," she replied without taking any offense of Senator Helms' sarcasm. "Send the rascal in," Helms said while rising from his chair. He'd heard Senate Cloak Room gossip about the exploits of General William Yarborough, USA (retired), but had as yet had not met the man. Before Senator Helms could get around his desk, General Yarborough came striding into the office. General Yarborough introduced himself and shook hands with both Senators. Helms, not easily impressed, had to admit that General Yarborough made a good first impression. He had that military bearing and air of confidence one seldom sees among the political rabble forever looking for scraps and bones in Washington, D.C. "General, I'm glad I've finally had to chance

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