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The Wing-and-Wing von Cooper, James Fenimore (eBook)

  • Erscheinungsdatum: 09.10.2017
  • Verlag: Strelbytskyy Multimedia Publishing
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The Wing-and-Wing

The wandering fire is nothing like a mysterious spark in a morass... From a mysterious lugger - a high-speed sailing ship moored in the small harbor of the city of Porto Ferrera, a handsome young man, who named himself as Jack Smith, came ashore. However, in this guy, the English officer Edward Griffin recognizes Raul Ivar - a desperate, reckless, but noble sea-robber. And he decides to capture Raul and his lugger with a memorable name 'Wandering Fire'. Adventure begins ... Pretty illustrations by Vladislav Kolomoets provide you with new impressions from reading this legendary story.

Produktinformationen

    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: none
    Seitenzahl: 702
    Erscheinungsdatum: 09.10.2017
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9783962555719
    Verlag: Strelbytskyy Multimedia Publishing
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The Wing-and-Wing

Chapter I

"Filled with the face of heaven, which from afar

Comes down upon the waters; all its hues,

From the rich sunset to the rising star,

Their magical variety diffuse:

And now they change: a paler shadow strews

Its mantle o'er the mountains; parting day

Dies like the dolphin, whom each pang imbues

With a new color as it gasps away,

The last still loveliest, till - 'tis gone - and all is grey."

Childe Harold

The charms of the Tyrrhenian Sea have been sung since the days of Homer.

That the Mediterranean generally, and its beautiful boundaries of Alps and Apennines, with its deeply indented and irregular shores, forms the most delightful region of the known earth, in all that relates to climate, productions, and physical formation, will be readily enough conceded by the traveller. The countries that border on this midland water, with their promontories buttressing a mimic ocean - their mountain-sides teeming with the picturesque of human life - their heights crowned with watch-towers - their rocky shelves consecrated by hermitages, and their unrivalled sheet dotted with sails, rigged, as it might be, expressly to produce effect in a picture, form a sort of world apart, that is replete with charms which not only fascinate the beholder, but which linger in the memories of the absent like visions of a glorious past.

Our present business is with this fragment of a creation that is so eminently beautiful, even in its worst aspects, but which is so often marred by the passions of man, in its best. While all admit how much nature has done for the Mediterranean, none will deny that, until quite recently, it has been the scene of more ruthless violence, and of deeper personal wrongs, perhaps, than any other portion of the globe. With different races, more widely separated by destinies than even by origin, habits, and religion, occupying its northern and southern shores, the outwork, as it might be, of Christianity and Mohammedanism, and of an antiquity that defies history, the bosom of this blue expanse has mirrored more violence, has witnessed more scenes of slaughter, and heard more shouts of victory, between the days of Agamemnon and Nelson, than all the rest of the dominions of Neptune together. Nature and the passions have united to render it like the human countenance, which conceals by its smiles and godlike expression the furnace that so often glows within the heart, and the volcano that consumes our happiness. For centuries, the Turk and the Moor rendered it unsafe for the European to navigate these smiling coasts; and when the barbarian's power temporarily ceased, it was merely to give place to the struggles of those who drove him from the arena.

The circumstances which rendered the period that occurred between the years 1790 and 1815 the most eventful of modern times are familiar to all; though the incidents which chequered that memorable quarter of a century have already passed into history. All the elements of strife that then agitated the world appear now to have subsided as completely as if they owed their existence to a remote age; and living men recall the events of their youth as they regard the recorded incidents of other centuries. Then, each month brought its defeat or its victory; its account of a government overturned, or of a province conquered. The world was agitated like men in a tumult. On that epoch the timid look back with wonder; the young with doubt; and the restless with envy.

The years 1798 and 1799 were two of the most memorable of this ever-memorable period; and to that stirring and teeming season we must carry the mind of the reader in order to place it in the midst of the scenes it is our object to portray.

Toward the close of a fine day in the month of August, a light, fairy-like craft was fanning he

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