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VOLTAIRE'S ROMANCES: 20+ Novels, Short Stories, Satires & Fables (Illustrated) Candide, Zadig, The Huron, Plato's Dream, Micromegas, The White Bull, The Princess of Babylon, The Sage and the Atheist, The Man of Forty Crowns, Bababec, Ancient Faith and Fable, The Study of Nature... von Voltaire (eBook)

  • Erscheinungsdatum: 02.03.2016
  • Verlag: e-artnow
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VOLTAIRE'S ROMANCES: 20+ Novels, Short Stories, Satires & Fables (Illustrated)

This carefully crafted ebook: 'VOLTAIRE'S ROMANCES: 20+ Novels, Short Stories, Satires & Fables (Illustrated)' is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. François-Marie Arouet (1694-1778), known by his nom de plume Voltaire, was a French Enlightenment writer, historian, and philosopher famous for his wit, his attacks on the established Catholic Church, and his advocacy of freedom of religion, freedom of expression, and separation of church and state. Voltaire was a versatile writer, producing works in almost every literary form, including plays, poems, novels, essays, and historical and scientific works. He was an outspoken advocate of several liberties, despite the risk this placed him in under the strict censorship laws of the time. As a satirical polemicist, he frequently made use of his works to criticize intolerance, religious dogma, and the French institutions of his day. Table of Contents: Candide Zadig Micromegas The Huron The White Bull The Man of Forty Crowns The Princess of Babylon The Sage and the Atheist Memnon the Philosopher The Black and the White The World as it Goes Andre des Touches at Siam Bababec Jeannot and Colin The Travels of Scarmentado A Conversation with a Chinese Plato's Dream Pleasure in Having no Pleasure An Adventure in India The Good Brahmin The Two Comforters Ancient Faith and Fable The Study of Nature Dialogue between Marcus Aurelius and a Recollet Friar Dialogue between a Brahmin and a Jesuit Dialogues between Lucretius and Posidonius Dialogue between a Client and His Lawyer Dialogue between Madame De Maintenon and Mademoiselle De L'Enclos Dialogue between a Savage and a Bachelor of Arts

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    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: watermark
    Seitenzahl: 911
    Erscheinungsdatum: 02.03.2016
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9788026850717
    Verlag: e-artnow
    Größe: 6294 kBytes
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VOLTAIRE'S ROMANCES: 20+ Novels, Short Stories, Satires & Fables (Illustrated)

CHAPTER XIX.
WHAT HAPPENED TO THEM AT SURINAM, AND HOW CANDIDE BECAME ACQUAINTED WITH MARTIN.

Table of Contents

Our travellers' first day's journey was very pleasant; they were elated with the prospect of possessing more riches than were to be found in Europe, Asia, and Africa together. Candide, in amorous transports, cut the name of Miss Cunegund on almost every tree he came to. The second day two of their sheep sunk in a morass, and were swallowed up with their lading; two more died of fatigue; some few days afterwards seven or eight perished with hunger in a desert, and others, at different times, tumbled down precipices, or were otherwise lost, so that, after travelling about a hundred days they had only two sheep left of the hundred and two they brought with them from El Dorado. Said Candide to Cacambo:

"You see, my dear friend, how perishable the riches of this world are; there is nothing solid but virtue."

"Very true," said Cacambo, "but we have still two sheep remaining, with more treasure than ever the king of Spain will be possessed of; and I espy a town at a distance, which I take to be Surinam, a town belonging to the Dutch. We are now at the end of our troubles, and at the beginning of happiness."

As they drew near the town they saw a negro stretched on the ground with only one half of his habit, which was a kind of linen frock; for the poor man had lost his left leg and his right hand.

"Good God," said Candide in Dutch, "what dost thou here, friend, in this deplorable condition?"

"I am waiting for my master, Mynheer Vanderdendur, the famous trader," answered the negro.

"Was it Mynheer Vanderdendur that used you in this cruel manner?"

"Yes, sir," said the negro; "it is the custom here. They give a linen garment twice a year, and that is all our covering. When we labor in the sugar works, and the mill happens to snatch hold of a finger, they instantly chop off our hand; and when we attempt to run away, they cut off a leg. Both these cases have happened to me, and it is at this expense that you eat sugar in Europe; and yet when my mother sold me for ten patacoons on the coast of Guinea, she said to me, 'My dear child, bless our fetiches; adore them forever; they will make thee live happy; thou hast the honor to be a slave to our lords the whites, by which thou wilt make the fortune of us thy parents.' Alas! I know not whether I have made their fortunes; but they have not made mine: dogs, monkeys, and parrots are a thousand times less wretched than I. The Dutch fetiches who converted me tell me every Sunday that the blacks and whites are all children of one father, whom they call Adam. As for me, I do not understand anything of genealogies; but if what these preachers say is true, we are all second cousins; and you must allow that it is impossible to be worse treated by our relations than we are."

"O Pangloss!" cried out Candide, "such horrid doings never entered thy imagination. Here is an end of the matter; I find myself, after all, obliged to renounce thy Optimism."

"Optimism," said Cacambo, "what is that?"

"Alas!" replied Candide, "it is the obstinacy of maintaining that everything is best when it is worst." And so saying he turned his eyes towards the poor negro, and shed a flood of tears; and in this weeping mood he entered the town of Surinam.

Immediately upon their arrival our travellers inquired if there was any vessel in the harbor which they might send to Buenos Ayres. The person they addressed themselves to happened to be the master of a Spanish bark, who offered to agree with them on moderate terms, and appointed them a meeting at a public house. Thither Candide and his faithful Cacambo went to wait for him, taking with them their two sheep.

Candide, who was all frankness and sincerity, made an ingenuous recital of his adventures to the Spaniard, declari

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