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Advances in Child Development and Behavior

  • Erscheinungsdatum: 01.06.2008
  • Verlag: Elsevier Textbooks
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Advances in Child Development and Behavior

Volume 36 of the Advances in Child Development and Behavior series includes ten chapters that highlight some of the most recent research in developmental and educational psychology.

A wide array of topics are discussed in detail, including King Solomon's Take on Word Learning, Orthographic Learning, Attachment and Affect Regulation, Function, Family Dynamics, Rational Thought, Childhood Aggression, Social Cognitive Neuroscience of Infancy, Children's Thinking, and Remote Transfer in Children, and much more. Each chapter provides in depth discussions of various developmental psychology specializations. This volume serves as an invaluable resource for psychology researchers and advanced psychology students.

Goes in depth to address eight different developmental and educational psychology topics
A necessary resource for both psychology researchers and students

Produktinformationen

    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: AdobeDRM
    Seitenzahl: 520
    Erscheinungsdatum: 01.06.2008
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9780080880280
    Verlag: Elsevier Textbooks
    Größe: 7334 kBytes
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Advances in Child Development and Behavior

Orthographic Learning, Phonological Recoding, and Self-Teaching

David L. Share Department of Learning Disabilities, Faculty of Education, University of Haifa, Mount Carmel, 31905, Haifa, Israel

I. INTRODUCTION

A. PROLOGUE

B. THE CRUCIAL ROLE OF ORTHOGRAPHIC LEARNING IN THE ACQUISITION OF SKILLED READING

II. THE SELF-TEACHING THEORY OF ORTHOGRAPHIC LEARNING

A. SOME HISTORICAL BACKGROUND

B. KEY FEATURES OF SELF-TEACHING

III. EMPIRICAL FINDINGS

A. THE EARLY PIONEERS

B. STUDIES OF ORTHOGRAPHIC LEARNING WITHIN THE SELF-TEACHING FRAMEWORK

C. INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN SELF-TEACHING, DYSLEXICS, AND OTHER POOR READERS

D. EARLY ONSET

E. OTHER SELF-TEACHING MECHANISMS?

IV. SUMMARY, CONCLUSIONS, AND THE WAY AHEAD

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

REFERENCES
I Introduction

A PROLOGUE

First, I would like to ask the reader to read the following short passage. Please read at your own natural reading pace - much as you would read a light novel.

In the middle of Australia is the hottest town in the world. This town is called Sloak and it's right in the middle of the desert. In Sloak, the temperature can reach 60 degrees. It's so hot that even the flies drop dead and the rubber tires on the cars start to melt. You can even fry an egg on the roof of your car.

The houses in Sloak are under the ground, far away from the heat of the sun. The people also dig for gold deep under the ground. In Sloak, they drink lots of beer to stay cool. They drink beer in the morning, in the afternoon, and in the evening. The beer in Sloak is very strong. If you're not used to drinking beer you'd better watch out!

Would you like to live in Sloak?

It will immediately strike the reader that this text is aimed not at beer-lovers but at young children - actually second graders. And those familiar with the Australian "outback" will appreciate that this imaginary town is not entirely fictitious. Now that I've managed to filibuster for a sentence or two, we can get back to the story of orthographic learning, but first, one other small request. Without going back to the text , look carefully at the following two spellings - SLOAK / SLOKE . Which do you think was the name of the town in the story? Because both are what we call "pseudowords" - invented or possible words that do not actually exist, no prior knowledge is available to help out. And because the two spellings sound exactly the same, in weighing up the two alternatives you have only your memory to rely upon for the specific spelling seen a few moments ago. So, how did you do? It turns out that skilled adult readers and young inexperienced readers alike demonstrate a surprisingly strong preference for the original spelling. It might be objected, however, that this spelling somehow looks "right" or more "wordlike," and would have been favored even if it had not appeared in the passage. But even when the alternative spelling Sloke replaces Sloak throughout the passage, the advantage for this spelling is just as strong (see, e.g., Share, 1999 ). In any case, these preexisting "orthographic pr

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