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Nanomaterials, Polymers and Devices Materials Functionalization and Device Fabrication

  • Erscheinungsdatum: 21.04.2015
  • Verlag: Wiley
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Nanomaterials, Polymers and Devices

Providing an eclectic snapshot of the current state of the art and future implications of the field, Nanomaterials, Polymers, and Devices: Materials Functionalization and Device Fabrication presents topics grouped into three categorical focuses:
  • The synthesis, mechanism and functionalization of nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, silica, and quantum dots
  • Various functional devices which properties and structures are tailored with emphasis on nanofabrication. Among discussed are light emitting diodes, nanophotonic, nano-optical, and photovoltaic devices
  • Nanoelectronic devices, which include semiconductor, nanotube and nanowire-based electronics, single-walled carbon-nanotube based nanoelectronics, as well as thin-film transistors

Produktinformationen

    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: AdobeDRM
    Seitenzahl: 584
    Erscheinungsdatum: 21.04.2015
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9781118867198
    Verlag: Wiley
    Größe: 87316 kBytes
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Nanomaterials, Polymers and Devices

List of Illustrations

  1. Chapter 1: THE FUNCTIONALIZATION OF CARBON NANOTUBES AND NANO-ONIONS
    1. Figure 1.1 Model structures of carbon: (a) diamond, (b) fullerene, (c) multilayer fullerene, (d) single-walled carbon nanotubes, (e) double-walled carbon nanotubes, (f) multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and (g) graphene. (Reproduced with permission from Reference (2)).
    2. Figure 1.2 Synthetic strategy for grafting linear glycopolymer from surfaces of MWNTs by ATRP. (Reproduced with permission from Reference (23)).
    3. Figure 1.3 Schematic illustration of (a) CNTs dispersed mechanically in polymer matrix, (b) polymer-bonded CNTs, (c) polymer-coated CNTs by layer-by-layer self-assembly approach, and (d) polymer-functionalized CNTs dispersed in free polymer matrix. (Source: Reproduced with permission from Reference 39).
    4. Figure 1.4 Schematic description of dendritic polymers. (Source: Reproduced with permission from Reference 51).
    5. Figure 1.5 HP-grafted CNTs - branched-like trees. Graphical representation of a section of MWNTHP nanohybrids presented in this chapter (top) and a photograph of the trees grown on a hillside (bottom). (Source: Reproduced with permission from Reference 54).
    6. Figure 1.6 TEM images of MWNT-HP5 at (a) low magnification and (b) high magnification. (Source: Reproduced with permission from Reference 54).
    7. Figure 1.7 Complete functionalization strategy of ROP. (Source: Reproduced with permission from Reference 60).
    8. Figure 1.8 Synthesis of dendritic HP-MWNT nanohybrid through in situ ROP. (Source: Reproduced with permission from Reference (54)).
    9. Figure 1.9 Grafting of PCL onto MWNTs. (Source: Reproduced with permission from Reference 62).
    10. Figure 1.10 Functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG) by anionic ring-opening polymerization (ROP) and modification of the grafted HPG. (Source: Reproduced with permission from Reference 65).
    11. Figure 1.11 Chemical reactions on f-MWNTs. (Source: Reproduced with permission from Reference 66).
    12. Figure 1.12 Synthetic strategy for grafting hyperbranched glycopolymer from surfaces of MWNTs by self-condensing vinyl copolymerization (SCVCP) of inimer (AB*) and monomer (M) via ATRP. (Source: Reproduced with permission from Reference 23).
    13. Figure 1.13 Carbon nano-"onions" created by arc discharge in water. (a) Image of a carbon arc discharge in water. Scale bar, 12 mm. (b, c) Low- and high-magnification electron micrographs of carbon nano-onions floating on the water surface after their production. Scale bars, 10 nm. (Source: Reproduced with permission from Reference 95).
    14. Figure 1.14 Reductive treatment of CNOs by a Na-K alloy in 1,2-DME and subsequent alkylation using 1-bromohexadecane. (Source: Reproduced with permission from Reference 97).
  2. Chapter 2: THE FUNCTIONALIZATION OF GRAPHENE AND ITS ASSEMBLED MACROSTRUCTURES
    1. Figure 2.1 A schematic depicting the synthesis of pyrene-terminated PNIPAAm using a pyrene-functional RAFT agent and the subsequent attachment of the polymer to graphene. (Source: Reproduced with permission from (19)).
    2. Figure 2.2 (a) (Left) Photograph of a polymer PmPV/DCE solution with GNRs stably suspended in the solution. (Right) Schematic drawing of a graphene nanoribbon with two units of a PmPV polymer chain adsorbed on top of the graphene via pi-stacking. (b) AFM images of selected GNRs with widths in the sub-10-nm regions.
    3. Figure 2.3 (a) Photographs of GO/PVA mixtures with varied content ratio. (b) Photographs of the pH-induced gel-sol transition. (Source: Reproduced with permission from (23)).

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