text.skipToContent text.skipToNavigation
background-image

Borrowed Words: A History of Loanwords in English A History of Loanwords in English von Durkin, Philip (eBook)

  • Erscheinungsdatum: 08.01.2014
  • Verlag: OUP Oxford
eBook (ePUB)
11,89 €
inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
Sofort per Download lieferbar

Online verfügbar

Borrowed Words: A History of Loanwords in English

The rich variety of the English vocabulary reflects the vast number of words it has taken from other languages. These range from Latin, Greek, Scandinavian, Celtic, French, Italian, Spanish, and Russian to, among others, Hebrew, Maori, Malay, Chinese, Hindi, Japanese, andYiddish. Philip Durkin's full and accessible history reveals how, when, and why. He shows how to discover the origins of loanwords, when and why they were adopted, and what happens to them once they have been. Thelong documented history of English includes contact with languages in a variety of contexts, including: the dissemination of Christian culture in Latin in Anglo-Saxon England, and the interactions of French, Latin, Scandinavian, Celtic, and English during the Middle Ages, exposure to languagesthroughout the world during the colonial era, and the effects of using English as an international language of science. Philip Durkin describes these and other historical inputs, introducing the approaches each requires, from the comparative method for the earliest period to documentary and corpus research in the modern. The discussion is illustrated at every point with examples taken from a variety of different sources. The framework Dr Durkin develops can be used to explore lexical borrowingin any language. This outstanding book is for everyone interested in English etymology and in loanwords more generally. It will appeal to a wide general public and at the same time offers a valuable reference for scholars and students of the history of English.

Produktinformationen

    Format: ePUB
    Kopierschutz: AdobeDRM
    Erscheinungsdatum: 08.01.2014
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9780191667077
    Verlag: OUP Oxford
Weiterlesen weniger lesen

Kundenbewertungen