text.skipToContent text.skipToNavigation
background-image

Tones/Countertones: English Translations, Adaptations, Imitations and Transformations of Short Poetic Texts from the Latin, Italian, French, Spanish, and German. A Bilingual Edition von Cranston, Philip (eBook)

  • Verlag: Digitalia
eBook (PDF)
69,95 €
inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
Sofort per Download lieferbar

Online verfügbar

Tones/Countertones: English Translations, Adaptations, Imitations and Transformations of Short Poetic Texts from the Latin, Italian, French, Spanish, and German. A Bilingual Edition

Tones/Countertones proposes formal verse translations of a large selection of well-known (and less well-known) poetry, drawn from ten centuries and five languages: Latin, Italian, French, Spanish, and German. Included are short poems and excerpts from long poems by, among others, Vergil, Horace, Dante, Petrarch, Gil Vicente, Marot, Du Bellay, Ronsard, La Fontaine, Voltaire, Goethe, Foscolo, Leopardi, Musset, Baudelaire, Bécquer, Mallarmé, Rimbaud, Rilke, Apollinaire, Supervielle, and Char. A thirteen-page introduction lays out, in some detail, the translator's methods and procedures, referring specifically to texts found in this volume and arguing that (despite reservations or even strong objections by critics -and poets – like Yves Bonnefoy) a poem's form is as essential as its content – and is, in fact, essential to its content. In an "Afterword," Roger Asselineau, a published poet and professor emeritus of the Sorbonne, writes: "Tones/Countertones, offering a broad sampling of Western literatures of diverse periods, is . . . in every respect remarkable: at once translation and poetry."

Produktinformationen

    Format: PDF
    Kopierschutz: AdobeDRM
    Seitenzahl: 174
    Sprache: Englisch
    ISBN: 9781882528394
    Verlag: Digitalia
    Größe: 3804kBytes
Weiterlesen weniger lesen

Tones/Countertones: English Translations, Adaptations, Imitations and Transformations of Short Poetic Texts from the Latin, Italian, French, Spanish, and German. A Bilingual Edition

AD PYRRHAM (p. 24)

Quis multa gracilis te puer in rosa

perfusus liquidis urget odoribus

grato, Pyrrha, sub antro?

cui flavam religas comam,

simplex munditiis? Heu quotiens fidem

mutatosque déos flebit et áspera

nigis aequora ventis

emirabitur insolens,

qui nunc te fruitur credulus áurea,

qui semper vacuam, semper amabilem

sperat, nescius aurae

fallacis. Miseri, quibus

intemptata nites. Me tabula sacer

votiva paries indicat uvida

suspendisse potenti

vestimenta maris deo.

Quintus Horatius Flaccus (65-8 BC)

Carminum I: 5

TO PYRRHA

What slender youth, besprinkled and perfumed,

Upon a bed of roses clasps you, Pyrrha,

Now in the pleasant grotto?

For whom is your golden hair

Bound artfully plain? How oft of faith

And the changeful gods will he complain, and waters

Rough with the darkening winds

Will gaze upon in wonder,

Who, credulous, enjoys you now-pure gold,

Who always free, always alluring dreams

You`ll stay, not guessing how light

Winds change. Unhappy they

For whom, untried, you glitter. As for me,

That sacred wall with my vowed tablet shows

IVe hung up dripping garments

To the great god of the sea.

Pérsicos odi, puer, apparatus,

displicent nexae philyra coronae,

mitte sectari rosa quo locorum

sera moretur.

Simplici myrto nihil allabores

sedulus, curo: ñeque te ministrum

dedecet myrtus ñeque me sub arta

vite bibentern.

Horace, Carminum I: 38

SIMPLE MYRTLE

Ho, lad!

Persian trappings I disdain!

Your linden crowns are twined in vain.

Why hunt late roses at such pain

(Their numbers shrinking)?

Simple myrtle suits me fine-

Adorns your head, so why not mine?

As here beneath the twisted vine

I`m sitting

drinking!

. . . et factus est repente de cáelo sonus

tanquam advenientis spiritus vehementis,

et replevit totam domum

ubi erant sedentes.

Et apparuerunt illis dispertitae linguae

tanquam ignis,

seditque supra singulos eorum:

et repleti sunt omnes Spiritu sancto,

et coeperunt loqui variis linguis,

prout Spiritus sanctus dabat eloqui illis.

Acîus Apostolorum II: 1-4

THE GIFT OF TONGUES

Of a sudden from the heavens

Like a mighty rush of wind

Came a sound that filled the dwelling

Where they sat in calm of mind.

There they saw bright tongues of fire,

And on each man sat a flame,

For the Holy Spirit, breathing,

Filled them till, each one the same,

They in different tongues were speaking

As the Spirit through them came.

Weiterlesen weniger lesen

Kundenbewertungen